Cost-Effective Analysis of Bevacizumab for Ovarian Cancer

Posted:03/31/11

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology concludes that “[t]he addition of bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer is not cost effective.”

The study analyzed costs of treating women with advanced ovarian cancer according to the three arms of the GOG-218 study: (1) paclitaxel + carboplatin, (2) paclitaxel + carboplatin + bevacizumab or (3) paclitaxel + carboplatin + bevacizumab with bevacizumab as maintenance. The first arm cost $2.5 million, the second $21.4 million and the third arm $78.3 million.  This led to the second arm increasing cost by $479,712 per progression-free life year saved, and the third arm increasing cost by $401,088 per progression-free life year saved.

The GOG-218 study showed an almost four month improvement in progression free survival for women on the third arm of the trial (compared to the first arm).

The full abstract is availble here

Read an editorial published in the same journal, on the topic, here